Still Breathing: Weight Loss Takes Determination

One of the things that surprises people about me is the music I listen to.  Scrolling through the music on my iPod you’ll find Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Led Zeppelin, Hans Zimmer, Yo-Yo Ma, The Chieftains, Skillet, Disturbed, James Newton Howard, Kitty Wells, John Fogerty, Patsy Cline, Five Finger Death Punch, John Denver and Bush among others.  Believe it or not, I am picky about what I listen to. You would think as I get older, my taste in music would start mellowing, but it’s just in the last few years that I downloaded the Skillet, Disturbed and FFDP. And, yes, I still listen to the old country (the new country I really don’t care for!)

My taste in music really surprised my sister. When it comes to music, we really are speaking different languages.  She likes jazz and some things I can’t even begin to describe (bossa nova?) When I initially starting listening to hard rock (Queen was the first), she put it down to rebelling against my parents, but it’s just kept growing and expanding.  One of my favorite bands which has also stood the test of time is Green Day. Their music speaks to me and it’s still got a lot to say. The song that’s talking to me most recently is “Still Breathing.”

Let’s be honest: music is art and even though the artist may have intended a song to about something specific, it has something different to say to each person. To me, this one was pretty straightforward: “I’m still breathing on my own.”  We might be scared, we might be hurt, we might be overwhelmed, but we’re still breathing and we’re still alive.

We need to keep breathing and we need to keep struggling for what we want in our lives and for ourselves.  I know it sounds trite and cliche but that doesn’t mean it’s not true. If we don’t believe we’re worth fighting for, why would anyone else fight for us? I often say something similar when it comes to weight loss: if you don’t want to lose weight, no one else can lose it for you! You have to want this!

You hear something similar from most people when it comes to weight loss programs or work out programs or anything else that requires your participation: you get out of it what you put into it. It takes practice to learn anything, to get good at anything or to succeed at anything.  We’ve all heard the Edison quote about light bulbs but my favorite quote of his says “opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.”

Losing weight is no different: it takes a lot of work and a whole lot of determination to make healthy changes, to lose weight and to keep it off.  If we want to improve our health and improve the quality of our lives, it takes work to make it happen.  Seriously, if weight loss were easy, we wouldn’t be a nation of obese individuals! We wouldn’t have expressions like “yo-yo dieting” and businesses like Nutrisystem and Weight Watchers wouldn’t exist. But these businesses exist precisely because weight loss is so difficult.  They are trying to make it easier and while I completely respect their intentions, I think they are doing it all wrong: it’s the work that makes it valuable.

Another favorite quote of mine is by Thomas Paine: “what we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: ’tis dearness only that gives everything its value.” Do you remember the first car you ever bought and paid for yourself? Do you remember the first time someone spilled something in it? I’m sure you do! When I was in high school, there were two kinds of kids: those who bought their cars themselves and those whose parents paid for them. The older brother of a classmate had restored a 1957 pickup truck on his own, and even though the shop screwed up the royal blue paint job he’d ordered (it looked like a giant blueberry!), he was still proud of his hard work and babied his truck. By contrast, there were a couple of twins in the same class whose parents bought them a Corvette, and when they totaled it inside six months, their parents bought them another one.  Who do you think understood the value of their vehicles?

If losing ten pounds were as simple as switching from butter to margarine, no one would give it a second thought. We’d lose ten pounds and when we went on vacation, we’d think nothing of drinking mai-tais all day and eating cheesecake and pasta every night and when we came home and discovered we’d gained back that ten pounds, it’d be no big deal: “It’ll come back off as easily as before!” We all know that’s not true! Many of us struggle to lose the ten pounds and we continue to struggle to keep it off and when we’re stuck on vacation looking at buffet tables full of ravioli, cheesecake, garlic bread and cocktails, our first thought isn’t “wow, this looks good!” Okay- maybe it is, but it’s quickly followed by “how long will it take me to lose the weight I’d gain if I ate all this?” We’ve all dreaded stepping on the scale after vacation or the holidays: “how much did I gain? And how long until I’m back where I was before?”

Too often we give up before we even join the fight.  We hide from our weight and we hide from life. When things get hard, we sigh and dread just the thought of all the work involved. It’s work planning out our shopping list; it’s work saying no to all the snacks and goodies, and let’s not even discuss the ‘work’ involved in working out! “Why is it all so hard?” We give up and we hide rather than dig in and get it done. When we do that, we forget how good it feels when we take the stairs and aren’t winded when we reach our office; we forget how good it feels when we try on a new outfit and realize you need a smaller size; we forget how good it feels to get up in the morning actually feeling good instead of tired and burnt out! These are just some of the benefits of weight loss and being healthier: we can move without pain, we can do more, we feel better and aside from just looking great, we improve our overall physical and mental health. Yes, it is work, but it’s work worth doing!

It’s not always going to be easier and there will be times when we feel like we’ve been runover by life and circumstances and that all of our efforts are pointless.  We’re going to feel like exhausted and frustrated and start thinking more about giving up than what we’re working for.   Those are normal reactions to the hard work, but when they start popping up in your head, I want to remind you: you’re still breathing on your own.

2 thoughts on “Still Breathing: Weight Loss Takes Determination

  1. Dieting is hard, that s why I didn’t do it. I lost 50 pounds in 6 months by changing my lifestyle permanently.. I agree you need determination and more…
    I believe that you have to have a healthy lifestyle, a diet is just fooling yourself and eventually you will gain the weight again. When you live a better lifestyle you gain many advantages. Looking good and feeling good are only a small part of it. When you eat right and live an active lifestyle your quality of life improves. I lost 50 pounds in 6 months and have been living the life…. I have my own site with info and tips
    http://healtydietplans.com/
    I hope you will stop by and visit

    Liked by 1 person

    • I completely agree! I’ve changed to a healthier lifestyle permanently & I’ve never felt better & been happier! Thanks for the link- I’ll check out your site!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s