If You Ate It, OWN IT!: Weight Loss & Responsibility

Responsibility is a real issue when it comes to weight loss. We never like to admit that we were ‘bad’ and went off our diet or bailed on exercise just because we felt like it. We make ourselves feel better by dredging up an excuse or we rationalize why we ‘had to do’ what we did. In reality, whether we call it an excuse or a rationalization or a reason, the bottom line is our behavior is our responsibility.

Being responsible can be a real pain in the butt!  Remember when you were a kid and reached the “too old for a baby-sitter” age? It meant that you were old enough and trusted enough to stay home alone or old enough to watch your younger siblings. You were probably feeling a little proud but a little nervous too. It meant that you were responsible! It also meant that you were in charge, either of whomever you were watching or at the very least, in charge of your own behavior: YOU are in control!

As we can recall from being a kid, being in charge can be a little heady at times but to steal a phrase from the wise and immortal Stan Lee: “With great power comes great responsibility.” If you are in charge, you are responsible for what happens, whether it’s a great outcome or something not-so-great.  It was enough to make Peter Parker wish he wasn’t Spiderman and it’s enough to make us wish that we weren’t in charge of our own eating habits!

Unfortunately, what we eat really is our responsibility. Unless someone has a gun to our heads and it forcing us to eat those Krispy Kremes, we made the decision to eat them! Even if we are starving because we’ve missed breakfast and lunch and now we’ve showed up at some appointment and they’ve offered us those donuts, it is entirely within our abilities to say “no thank you!”  Yes, I know– harsh! But will we fall over dead if we’ve missed breakfast and lunch? Probably not! Barring a hypoglycemic fainting spell, we will probably be okay (if starving) until we can get something healthier for us, but this is when we start rationalizing why we had to eat something not on our diet.

I’ve said it before and it’s worth saying again: when we tell ourselves we are constantly at the mercy of others or circumstances, we cut off our own power to make positive changes! In plain simple language, if we have to eat what others make us eat, then how can we make positive changes to what we eat? Of course, others aren’t ‘making us eat anything,’ unless it’s those Krispy Kremes or that bag of Doritos or the family size box of Cheezits! Those we ‘had to eat’ because we really wanted them and came up with a justification for why they ‘made’ us eat them! In most cases, it’s what ‘they’ brought home for dinner or ‘they’ were eating them in front of us when ‘they’ knew we were trying to lose weight. For a lot of us, believing ‘they made us eat those’ absolves us of our responsibility for choosing to eat badly. But it also robs us of our power to make any positive changes too!

On a recent episode of My 600 Life, Dr. Nowzaradan’s patient Maja did something I had never seen before, and frankly, it shocked me. At 33, Maja weighed in at 689 lbs.  After her initial consultation, she went back to Oregon with her boyfriend Christian and over two months, she lost about 93 lbs, nearly the 100 the doctor wanted her to lose.  She was approved for bariatric surgery and proceeded to move to Houston as Dr. Nowzaradan had instructed.  The move to Texas unfortunately exacerbated the deteriorating relationship between Maja and her boyfriend. They fought all the way from Oregon to Houston and when Maja checked in with the doctor, he wanted her to come in to get weighed: she had lost only 9 lbs. The doctor cancelled her surgery with instructions to get back on track and lose another 50 lbs. Crying, Maja lashed out at Christian: “This is all your fault! You’re costing me my weight loss surgery! This is nobody’s fault but yours, Christian!” Really?

This melt-down in the doctor’s office wasn’t an anomaly: throughout her initial trip to Houston for the consultation, everything that was hard or didn’t go the way she wanted it to go was met with tears and blame. While packing for the trip, Christian wasn’t ‘taking it seriously’ and wasn’t being helpful enough for her.  Walking through the airport was ‘hard’ and she blamed the customer service woman she had talked to: she had ‘lied to [Maja] about how far it was.’ When she reached the car rental agency, they had reserved the wrong car for her and when Maja tried to squeeze in behind the wheel, her leg got stuck and she nearly fell out of the car. Christian had to help her out by laying her down on the ground so she could pull her leg out. Maja again started crying: she didn’t know how to get up and didn’t know what to do. Christian suggested she use the car to pull herself up and then she walked back to the car rental agency, cried again and demanded the car she had initially reserved.

Blame and tears appear to be Maja’s way of handling difficult situations. Because she is at the mercy of others (her parents, the car rental people, the ‘lying’ customer service woman, Christian, etc), she can’t control her reactions, so nothing is her responsibility.   What she eats, what she doesn’t eat: none of it is under her control. Really?

Maja is an extreme example of what most of us do every day: we blame our friends or family for ‘tempting us’ with unhealthy foods we like to eat. This past weekend, I was out with a friend for cheeseburgers and chocolate candy, and this is on top of the Girl Scout cookies I bought from another friend’s granddaughter! I don’t blame my friends for what I ate or didn’t eat on the weekend any more than I blame the Girl Scouts for making cookies.  I chose to eat what I ate (cheeseburger, sweet potato fries, jalapeno poppers, chocolate) and I own my choices. I chose to eat those foods just like I chose not to eat the cookies and other tempting junk food that was available.  Just because they are there or even offered to us does not mean that we have to eat them!

Owning our choices means we take responsibility, for the good stuff and the not-so-good stuff. Blaming others or circumstances has another deadly drawback: it teaches us to be helpless.  Not only do we have no responsibility, but having no power over our situation means we are helpless to help ourselves. That’s what it means to be at the mercy of others and circumstances.  The longer we rely on others for everything, the harder it is to learn how to do anything for ourselves, including helping ourselves and making our own decisions. 

Maja’s fall in the parking garage with the rental car struck a chord with me. In 2012, when I weighed about 440 lbs, I fell on my front lawn. My lawn is slightly slanted and while I was unloading my car, I stepped back into a hole near a sprinkler head. I knew the hole was there and normally managed to avoid it, but not this time.  It was dark; it was on the slant; I lost my balance and fell over on my butt and back onto the lawn.  As I was falling, my only thought was “miss the bricks! miss the bricks!” Luckily, I did miss my brick lamppost and because it had been raining a lot, my lawn was fairly soft and muddy.  Nevertheless, 440 lbs is a lot of weight to come down hard on my butt, my back and my head.  I went down like a proverbial tree in a forest! Once down, alone at night in the dark on my lawn, I lay there for a moment to see what hurt, and then, like Maja, I wondered how to get back up.  Like Maja, I rolled over onto my knees, crawled over to the brick lamppost and used it to help myself back up.  Then, I finished unloading my car, went inside and changed out of my muddy clothes.  Yes, I was a little a stiff the next day, but no hysterics, no tears, no blame.

The difference between my situation and Maja’s is learned behavior.  Maja went right off to the rental car agency and blamed them for her falling. I suppose I could have blamed my gardeners for making a big hole near the sprinkler head, but I knew the hole was there and unsuccessfully tried to avoid it. It’s a fact of life: things happen! Stress happens; unhappy relationships happen; emotional conflict happens! The more we learn to take back our power to make our own decisions, the stronger we are, whether it’s saying no to the box of Thin Mints or to dealing with a bad rental car experience. (Unfortunately, I also have experience with not fitting behind the wheel of rental cars!)

Being responsible starts with owning your choices and decisions.  It’s not always easy and it can be pretty embarrassing at times, but choosing to blame others not only takes away your responsibility: it takes away your power. The more you give away the blame, the more you give away your power. It’s time to take back what is rightfully yours: your power to choose what you eat and what you don’t eat! Whether you say yes to the donut or not, the choice is yours. Own it.

 

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